About the Fellowship Programs

Every Fellowship program takes themes that are timeless and global and looks at them through a lens that is timely and local.

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©Sharon Nathan

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Our Fellowship Programs

In each national program, Fellows learn from local experts and community members, visit museums and historical sites, and engage in practice-oriented workshops. Moreover, Fellows are constantly reflecting with one another and their program staff. Each program has a cohort of approximately 20 Fellows from different countries. They come from many different backgrounds – academia, the arts, activism – but share common values. Humanity in Action Fellows are collaborative, passionate, and open people. Above all, they learn to reflect on their own internalized biases, to think from the perspective of identity groups different from their own, and to advance change in their own communities.

 

2023 Dates

The US Mapping Democracy Fellowship | hybrid*
May 30 – June 21, 2023 

>> June 9 – 21 in person in Washington, D.C. 

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The Amsterdam Fellowship | in-person*
June 5 – 23, 2023
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The Berlin Fellowship | in-person*
June 5 – 23, 2023
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The Copenhagen Fellowship | in-person*
June 5 – 30, 2023
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The Warsaw Fellowship | in-person*
June 5 – 23, 2023
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The Sarajevo Fellowship | TBD
Information coming soon!
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*Due to COVID-19, we reserve the right to modify or cancel the program for reasons beyond our control.

The Mapping Democracy Fellowship

Accepting applications from

May 30 – June 21, 2023 | hybrid*

*May 30-June 7 consists of virtual programming. June 8 is a travel day and June 9-21 takes place in person in Washington DC. 


The 2023 US Fellowship program, titled “Mapping Democracy”, convenes a group of approximately 20 American and European Fellows. Fellows begin their journey with online community building and mapping workshops before gathering in Washington D.C. for in-person programming. 

Programmatically, the Fellowship consists of two distinct parts. In the opening virtual part, Fellows collaborate in small teams to identify and map an existing monument or space in Washington D.C. that was designed to epitomize democracy. Fellows map the monuments or spaces, incorporating their histories, stated objectives, and narratives. Fellows also address their public impact in regard to missions, myths, and truths. 

The second part of the Fellowship, based in Washington D.C., focuses on developing maps that depict the fragility and/or strength of liberal democracy as revealed on January 6, 2021. A full range of mapping possibilities could include subjects such as what led to January 6th: white supremacy, housing inequities, and educational segregation, as well as maps of regret or aspiration.

Due to COVID-19, we reserve the right to modify or cancel the program for reasons beyond our control.

The Amsterdam Fellowship

Accepting applications from

  • The Netherlands
  • USA
  • Greece
  • ___
  • The Amsterdam Fellowship accepts applicants from the countries mentioned above.

June 5 – 23, 2023 | in-person Fellowship*

*June 5-6, 2023 consists of virtual programming with the international 2023 cohort of Fellows. June 8, 2023 is a travel day and June 9-23, 2023 takes place in person in Amsterdam. 


In 2023, our Amsterdam Fellowship will focus on the Netherlands’ colonial past and its repercussions throughout the 20st century until today.

The Amsterdam Fellowship enables participants to examine contemporary questions around human rights, democracy, and inclusion from a Dutch perspective. Fellows examine patterns and mechanisms that underpin human rights related challenges today, by learning from historical examples. The program traditionally takes the Second World War and the Holocaust as a starting point – a devastating example of the collapse of democracy and the denial of minority rights. Furthermore, the curriculum dives into the Dutch colonial past, as well as post Second World War labor migration to the Netherlands.

The Berlin Fellowship

Accepting applications from

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Photo: ©Sharon Nathan, 2022 European Fellow

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June 5 – 23, 2023 | in-person Fellowship*

*June 5-6, 2023 consists of virtual programming with the international 2023 cohort of Fellows. June 8, 2023 is a travel day and June 9-23, 2023 takes place in person in Berlin. 


In 2023, our Berlin Fellowship will focus on Germany’s colonial past and its repercussions throughout the 20st century until today.

The colonial injustice and violence that the German Reich enforced on regions in Africa and Asia had a lasting impact for both the colonized and the colonizer. Yet the German colonial project has traditionally found little attention in the shadow of another dark chapter of the country’s history – the National Socialist regime, the Shoah, and the systemic terror that the Nazis inflicted on all those who did not fit into their ideology. 

In the Fellowship, we will explore the ways in which colonial legacies play a central role for Germany’s national identity, social structure, and human rights realities. Why and how has this chapter of European and German history been silenced in the dominant discourses of remembrance? How is the way we remember the past connected with the many challenges our increasingly diverse democratic societies are facing, like Antisemitism, racism, hostility towards Muslims, trans- and homophobia, misogyny and other forms of discrimination? And how can we learn to counter group-focused hostility and protect democratic values? 

Berlin does not only carry enormous historical significance as the center of the German Reich’s colonial empire. It continues to be a pivotal point for contemporary social justice struggles. It hence offers a unique landscape to bridge past and present, and to learn for the future.

Due to COVID-19, we reserve the right to modify or cancel the program for reasons beyond our control.

The Copenhagen Fellowship

Accepting applications from

  • Denmark
  • Germany
  • USA
  • Bosnia & Herzegovina
  • Ukraine
  • ___
  • The Copenhagen Fellowship accepts applicants from the countries mentioned above.
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Photo by Johan Mouchet on Unsplash

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June 5 – 30, 2023 | in-person Fellowship*

*June 5-6, 2023 consists of virtual programming with the international 2023 cohort of Fellows. June 7 and 8, 2023 are a travel days and June 8-30, 2023 takes place in person in Copenhagen. 


The Humanity in Action Copenhagen Fellowship centers around a pivotal example of civil society acting in defense of human rights: the flight and rescue of the Danish Jews during World War II. Today, Denmark is still seen as a paragon of the successful progressive society: a beacon of wealth, happiness, and equality. The Copenhagen Fellowship investigates these narratives to reveal more complicated truths.

In a country lauded for its egalitarian healthcare, education, and welfare systems, political rhetoric against minority groups is on the rise, and nationalist sentiments simmering. The nation’s history has its darker sides, too.

In 2023 the Copenhagen Fellowship specifically explores issues of Climate Change, Human Rights, and Democracies in Crisis. The purpose of the 2023 Fellowship is to not loose sight of the climate crisis in the midst of all the other crises in the world today – the War in Ukarine, the energy crisis, inflation, covid-19, to name a few – and to preserve and strengthen democracy, pluralism and human rights. We will also explore how YOU can ACT to actively contribute to the CHANGES you want to bring about.

*Due to COVID-19, we reserve the right to modify or cancel the program for reasons beyond our control.

The Warsaw Fellowship

Accepting applications from

  • Germany
  • Poland
  • USA
  • Ukraine
  • ___
  • The Warsaw Fellowship accepts applicants from the countries mentioned above.

June 5 – 23, 2023 | in-person/hybrid Fellowship*


Ever since the conservative Law and Justice party gained power in 2015, Poland has been in a perpetual state of emergency, suspending human rights and targeting minorities. For the second year in a row, Poland has ranked lowest in the European Union for protection of LGBTQ+ rights. In late 2020, Poland has imposed a near total ban on abortion, prompting hundreds of thousands of women and their allies to protest Europe’s most restrictive abortion law. Independent media and judiciary continue to be undermined.

 

The 2023 Warsaw Fellowship will examine Poland’s failing democracy in the context of human rights violations and hate speech. We will also learn strategies of resistance from a vibrant civil society. Now, more than ever, we need to stand up for human rights!

 

*We reserve the right to modify or cancel the program for reasons beyond our control.

 

The Sarajevo Fellowship

Accepting applications from

TBD | Information coming soon!


The City of Sarajevo and its surrounding region provides a unique case study in how groups with different identities coexist. It is one of just a few truly “multiconfessional” cities in the world, but it also has one of the bloodiest and most tumultuous recent histories of any country in Europe.

The Sarajevo Fellowship delves into nuanced discussion of transitional justice, post-conflict identity politics, peace-building and socioeconomic transformation in marginalized local communities.

Academically well-rounded, the program adds diversity to the educational experiences and broadens the Humanity in Action program scope beyond Western Europe and the United States. It provides Fellows with an intellectual framework that connects issues in Bosnia and Herzegovina to both past and current global issues. It includes insightful lecture-style sessions with high level speakers and workshop-based learning units, which focuses more on discussions and Fellow interactions.

By challenging Fellows’ perspectives on human rights issues, the program aims to interrogate their own assumptions and encouraged them to question their scope and depth of knowledge of multiculturalism; economic inequality; interfaith dialogue; post-conflict social apathy, social unrests, divided communities and social exclusions; minority experiences and representations; progressive grassroots movements; the role of media and culture in a post-conflict setting; and civic resistance to various forms of institutionalized human rights violations.